distributed generation

Nearly 60 Percent of Utilities Are Reviewing Net-Metering Policies : Greentech Media

August 12, 2015 // 0 Comments

Three-quarters of utilities reported that they are investigating how to make behind-the-meter assets, such as distributed solar, part of their business model. That is because utilities see technology such as renewables combined with storage as key for operational demand response, and also because distributed generation is a growing threat to their near-term business. Source: Nearly 60 Percent of Utilities Are Reviewing Net-Metering Policies : Greentech Media

Liberalising energy data opens market opportunities | Engerati – Transmission and Distribution

July 17, 2015 // 0 Comments

Click the link and watch the interview ! In this live studio interview at Asian Utility Week, Peter Nemcek, vice president of research and development at Cybergrid, talks about the interesting results obtained from the e-Badge smart grid project which is an EU-funded FP7 project. Its objective is to propose an optimal pan-European Intelligent Balancing mechanism, which is also able to integrate Virtual Power Plant systems by means of an integrated communication infrastructure that can assist in the management of the electricity transmission and distribution grids in an optimized, controlled and secure manner. The three year project is now in its final year. Source: Liberalising energy data opens market opportunities | Engerati – Transmission and Distribution

Inside Duke Energy’s renewables strategy | Utility Dive

July 7, 2015 // 0 Comments

Today, most rooftop solar arrays are installed by third party providers like SolarCity and SunRun — not regulated utilities. But as solar proliferates, its residential adopters pay less money to the utility because they can generate or offset a portion of their electricity demand. That means utilities — many of them already facing stagnant or negative load growth — can see significant portions of their revenue lost if solar catches on among their customers. Worse, they argue, solar adopters still use the grid, but pay less for its upkeep, forcing those costs onto other customers. Source: Inside Duke Energy’s renewables strategy | Utility Dive

US solar PV grows 1.3 GW in Q1, installed cost drops 10% | Utility Dive

June 12, 2015 // 0 Comments

U.S. residential solar photovoltaic (PV) installed capacity grew by 437 MW in Q1 2015, a 76% increase over Q1 2014, according to the “Q1 U.S. Solar Market Insight report” from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association. The average residential installed cost was $3.48 per watt, 10% below Q1 2014’s installed cost. Source: US solar PV grows 1.3 GW in Q1, installed cost drops 10% | Utility Dive

100% renewables by 2045 is now the law in Hawaii | Utility Dive

June 11, 2015 // 0 Comments

Hawaii became the first state to commit to obtaining 100% of its electricity from renewables when Governor David Ige signed HB 623, mandating the state’s utilities reach that resource mix by 2045. The law, effective July 1, sets 30% by 2020, 40% by 2030, and 70% by 2040 interim targets. Source: 100% renewables by 2045 is now the law in Hawaii | Utility Dive

Innovative battery technology can benefit utilities | The Big Data Hub

June 9, 2015 // 0 Comments

IBM’s Jennifer Potter published a post about energy storage and the possible benefits for utilities: Tesla’s Powerwall Home Battery seems poised to wean consumers off the big grid. A recent TechCrunch article claims that a single battery pack, valued at $3,000, will let a household run entirely on solar energy. On the other hand, Wired’s Rhett Allain challenges these claims by explaining the physics of energy storage. According to Allain, a single 10 kWh Powerwall could not meet the electricity demands of a typical household. Surveys conducted by the U.S. Energy Information Administration average typical household use at 30 kWh a day, therefore, a customer would need three Powerwalls to stay off the grid entirely. Three powerwalls can be arranged, but this would only work for sunny states and countries. I don’t think that west- and nordic European countries have enough sunshine in the winter to even supply themselves with solar power. Source: Innovative battery technology can benefit utilities | The Big Data Hub

Researchers Use Graphene to Push the Speed Limit of Light to Electricity Conversion – Solar Thermal Magazine

June 5, 2015 // 0 Comments

The ultrafast creation of a photovoltage in graphene is possible due to the extremely fast and efficient interaction between all conduction band carriers in graphene. This interaction leads to a rapid creation of an electron distribution with an elevated electron temperature. Thus, the energy absorbed from light is efficiently and rapidly converted into electron heat. Next, the electron heat is converted into a voltage at the interface of two graphene regions with different doping. This photo-thermoelectric Source: Researchers Use Graphene to Push the Speed Limit of Light to Electricity Conversion – Solar Thermal Magazine

What’s Really Got the Attention of Utilities?   – Energy Efficiency Markets

June 3, 2015 // 0 Comments

When asked what policy or regulatory advances will impact the industry’s evolution most by 2020, utilities cited net metering and distributed generation  first (30 percent) followed by greenhouse gas emissions rules (22 percent).Why so? Because rules are rules. But distributed generation (DG) is a wild card. Source: What’s Really Got the Attention of Utilities?   – Energy Efficiency Markets