US

SolarCity adds Tesla battery to its new solar-plus-storage home product | Utility Dive

July 15, 2015 // 0 Comments

“The Tesla 7 kWh battery costs $7,000 installed and is meant to be cycled daily,” Tucson Electric Power’s Carmine Tilghman recently told Utility Dive. “At the average all-in electricity rate of $0.12 per kWh, the buyer saves $0.84 per day. And $7,000 divided by $0.84 per day means it will take 8,333 days or about 22.9 years to get the initial investment back for a battery that comes with a ten year warranty.” Source: SolarCity adds Tesla battery to its new solar-plus-storage home product | Utility Dive

Inside Duke Energy’s renewables strategy | Utility Dive

July 7, 2015 // 0 Comments

Today, most rooftop solar arrays are installed by third party providers like SolarCity and SunRun — not regulated utilities. But as solar proliferates, its residential adopters pay less money to the utility because they can generate or offset a portion of their electricity demand. That means utilities — many of them already facing stagnant or negative load growth — can see significant portions of their revenue lost if solar catches on among their customers. Worse, they argue, solar adopters still use the grid, but pay less for its upkeep, forcing those costs onto other customers. Source: Inside Duke Energy’s renewables strategy | Utility Dive

Storage update: Inside the sector’s hot Q1 and what’s next for utilities & suppliers | Utility Dive

June 12, 2015 // 0 Comments

First quarter numbers are often unimpressive because companies tend to put more effort into planning than building in the first three months of the year. But the U.S. deployed 5.8 MW of storage in Q1 2015, 16% more than Q1 2014. Utility-scale, in-front-of-the-meter storage, the sector’s biggest component, added 4.2 MW in six projects. Behind-the-meter (BTM) storage had its biggest Q1 ever, with 1.6 MW of capacity installed, a jump of 132% from Q1 2014. Source: Storage update: Inside the sector’s hot Q1 and what’s next for utilities & suppliers | Utility Dive

EEI 2015: 5 major utility CEOs on the transformation of the energy system | Utility Dive

June 11, 2015 // 0 Comments

Head over to Utility dive now for some insights! It’s not often that journalists get the chance to hear the leaders of four major utilities talk about the hot-button issues in the electric sector, but that’s exactly what the EEI annual convention provided Wednesday. The panel of the EEI board, moderated Dominion CEO Tom Farrell, featured outgoing EEI chair and Southern California Edison CEO Ted Craver, Exelon CEO Chris Crane, Southern Company CEO Tom Fanning, and American Electric Power CEO Nick Atkins. They spoke on a variety of topics, from renewables subsidies to storage and the Clean Power Plan. Source: EEI 2015: 5 major utility CEOs on the transformation of the energy system | Utility Dive

Inside Hawaii activists’ push to ditch HECO and transform the utility business model | Utility Dive

June 4, 2015 // 0 Comments

Power to the people: Hawaiian city councils are investigating how they can replace traditional electricity distribution by smart grids. In an effort to gather information on how to replace Hawaiian Electric Co. (HECO), Oahu’s Honolulu City Council is preparing to fund a study on options. To replace Maui Electric Co. (MECO), Maui County Mayor Alan Arakawa issued a Request for Proposals for a similar study.To replace Hawaii Electric Light Co. (HELCO) on the big island, an aggressive group has formed the Hawaii Island Electric Cooperative (HIEC). That group is basing its efforts on the model of Kauai’s successful Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) which handles 5% of the state’s load. Source: Inside Hawaii activists’ push to ditch HECO and transform the utility business model | Utility Dive

Who Owns the Data? – EnerNOC Blog

June 2, 2015 // 0 Comments

In the US alone, smart meters have been deployed to 4.6M commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, according to the Energy Information Administration. This represents only 11% of total deployment, but these smart meters serve nearly 340M megawatt-hours (MWh), making up 49% of all energy served by total advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) installed. [..] With these extensive deployments comes a high cost. Total capital costs per meter, including installation, range from $81 to $532, according to Siemens, and when multiplied by a million or so meters, costs can quickly inflate. One way utilities are accelerating their smart meter ROI is by using the AMI data to deliver shared utility-customer value, particularly for C&I customers. Source: Who Owns the Data? – EnerNOC Blog